""Bridging Required" for the center of floor joist span? [Archive] - InspectionNews (2023)

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Rich Sumen

04-02-2020, 11:34 AM

House has floor joints 2x10s, 16"OC, about 12-14 feet span, with no "bridging or blocking" in the
"center areas". Floor upstairs is bouncy.
I can not fine a code requiring "bridging", at center areas. (I do see a code for "blocking" at the ends of the joists, but only for the ends, and only if it is a 2x12+.
IS there a code for "center bridging" of joists???
Any help is appreciated, as I dealing with a new home builder.

Jerry Peck

04-02-2020, 12:18 PM

In the IRC, in 502.7, addresses what you are referring to as "blocking" at the ends, except that it applies to ALL joists regardless of size.

Bridging, in 502.7.1, is for joists which are larger than 2x12, in which case the bridging between joists shall not be spaced more than 8' apart.

Rich Sumen

04-02-2020, 12:29 PM

Thanks Jerry, But a further question... I read 502.7 but it only refers to the bracing / blocking at the "ends" of the joists, and only if 12"+. Is there a code / requirement for "cross bracing / x bracing" in the "center" of the joist areas? I have inspected a lot of new & older homes here in Ohio and this is the first time I have "not seen" diagonal bracing of 2x joists.

House has floor joints 2x10s, 16"OC, about 12-14 feet span, with no "bridging or blocking" in the
"center areas". Floor upstairs is bouncy.
I can not fine a code requiring "bridging", at center areas. (I do see a code for "blocking" at the ends of the joists, but only for the ends, and only if it is a 2x12+.
IS there a code for "center bridging" of joists???
Any help is appreciated, as I dealing with a new home builder.

Jerry Peck

04-02-2020, 02:33 PM

Thanks Jerry, But a further question... I read 502.7 but it only refers to the bracing / blocking at the "ends" of the joists, and only if 12"+.

From the IRC: ( https://codes.iccsafe.org/content/IRC2018P3 )
- R502.7 Lateral restraint at supports.
- - Joists shall be supported laterally at ends by full-depth solid blocking not less than 2 inches (51 mmm) nominal thickness or by attachment to a full-depth header, band or rim joist, ot to an adjoining stud or shall be otherwise provided with lateral support to precent rotation.
- - - Exceptions.
- - - - 1. Trusses (not typed here, not applicable to floor joists)
- - - - 2. In Seismic Design Categories d0, d1, and D2, lateral restraint shall be provided at each intermediate support.

Nothing in there about 12"+ that I see.

The exceeding 12 inches (12"+) is in the Bridging section, R502.7.1

Is there a code / requirement for "cross bracing / x bracing" in the "center" of the joist areas?

Again, read R502.7.1 of the IRC, that addresses bridging. ( https://codes.iccsafe.org/content/IRC2018P3/chapter-5-floors#IRC2018P3_Pt03_Ch05_SecR502.7 )

I have inspected a lot of new & older homes here in Ohio and this is the first time I have "not seen" diagonal bracing of 2x joists.

That's 'better design and construction', code is "minimum" design and construction, actually, code is the most unsafe/least safe on is legally allowed to build something ... code is not 'good', 'better' or 'best' (not even 'good' practices, only "minimum" practices).

Rich Sumen

04-02-2020, 03:09 PM

OK, Well.... 502.7.1 States "blocking / bridging" is only required for joists exceeding 2 x 12", but no notes about any cross bracing in "center joist areas". (my original question). If that's all there is, I guess "center area" "bracing / bridging" would not be required. (seems odd to me, and just dumb not to do).
As always, thanks for your help.

From the IRC: ( https://codes.iccsafe.org/content/IRC2018P3 )
- R502.7 Lateral restraint at supports.
- - Joists shall be supported laterally at ends by full-depth solid blocking not less than 2 inches (51 mmm) nominal thickness or by attachment to a full-depth header, band or rim joist, ot to an adjoining stud or shall be otherwise provided with lateral support to precent rotation.
- - - Exceptions.
- - - - 1. Trusses (not typed here, not applicable to floor joists)
- - - - 2. In Seismic Design Categories d0, d1, and D2, lateral restraint shall be provided at each intermediate support.

Nothing in there about 12"+ that I see.

The exceeding 12 inches (12"+) is in the Bridging section, R502.7.1

Again, read R502.7.1 of the IRC, that addresses bridging. ( https://codes.iccsafe.org/content/IRC2018P3/chapter-5-floors#IRC2018P3_Pt03_Ch05_SecR502.7 )

That's 'better design and construction', code is "minimum" design and construction, actually, code is the most unsafe/least safe on is legally allowed to build something ... code is not 'good', 'better' or 'best' (not even 'good' practices, only "minimum" practices).

Jerry Peck

04-02-2020, 04:11 PM

OK, Well.... 502.7.1 States "blocking / bridging" is only required for joists exceeding 2 x 12", but no notes about any cross bracing in "center joist areas". (my original question). If that's all there is, I guess "center area" "bracing / bridging" would not be required. (seems odd to me, and just dumb not to do).
As always, thanks for your help.

I don't know how much simpler I can make the answer, maybe typing in the code section and using underlining and bold?

R502.7.1 Bridging.
Joists exceeding a nominal 2 inches by 12 inches (51 mm by 305 mm) shall be supported laterally by solid blocking, diagonal bridging (wood or metal) or a continuous 1-inch by 3-inch (25 mm by 76 mm) strip nailed across the bottom of the joists perpendicular to the joists at intervals not exceeding 8 feet (2438 mm).

That not only specifically addressing diagonal bridging (which is what you asked about), it also address solid blocking, and another alternative, but it also specifically addresses your "center area" you asked about by stating that the bridging you asked about (or the solid blocking, or the alternative) shall not be spaced greater than 8 feet apart (that "center area" ... given that R502.7 addresses 'the ends', R502.7.1 addresses 'the center area' 'between the ends').

Rich Sumen

04-02-2020, 04:56 PM

OK, Well maybe I have to use "bold, and underlining & red" to get you to understand what "my question" was about..... The question pertained to "A House with floor Joists that are 2x10s"

502.7.1 appears to addresses "
Joists exceeding a nominal 2 inches by 12 inches",
or am I "reading it / understanding it" wrong?

I don't know how much simpler I can make the answer, maybe typing in the code section and using underlining and bold?

R502.7.1 Bridging.
Joists exceeding a nominal 2 inches by 12 inches (51 mm by 305 mm) shall be supported laterally by solid blocking, diagonal bridging (wood or metal) or a continuous 1-inch by 3-inch (25 mm by 76 mm) strip nailed across the bottom of the joists perpendicular to the joists at intervals not exceeding 8 feet (2438 mm).

That not only specifically addressing diagonal bridging (which is what you asked about), it also address solid blocking, and another alternative, but it also specifically addresses your "center area" you asked about by stating that the bridging you asked about (or the solid blocking, or the alternative) shall not be spaced greater than 8 feet apart (that "center area" ... given that R502.7 addresses 'the ends', R502.7.1 addresses 'the center area' 'between the ends').

Jerry Peck

04-02-2020, 05:24 PM

OK, Well maybe I have to use "bold, and underlining & red" to get you to understand what "my question" was about..... The question pertained to "A House with floor Joists that are 2x10s"

502.7.1 appears to addresses "
Joists exceeding a nominal 2 inches by 12 inches",
or am I "reading it / understanding it" wrong?

You are reading that correctly.

So ... what does that tell you about what is required for 2x12 and smaller?

THAT is the answer to YOUR question.

Rich Sumen

04-03-2020, 06:51 AM

Bridging holds the joists in line and helps distribute the load carried by the floor unit. It is usually required when the joist spans are more than 8 feet.

It?s considered good practice by many (myself included) to install blocking or cross bridging at 8? intervals to help stiffen floor framing, but it?s only required for joists larger than 2x12 (nominal depth-width ratio > 6).

Yes, I get it, and congratulations. You were able to answer the question, without a direct answer! (A bit tiring, and drawn out). A suggestion, as this is a ?help forum??.
With a direct question, in this case? (Is there a code requiring 2x10s, 16"OC, about 12-14 feet in span, to have "bridging or bracing" in the "center areas"), could have been better communicated, with a simple direct answer. I.e. ?No code requires a 2x10 floor joist, to have center bridging or bracing. The only related reference to this is "R502.7.1 Bridging", but that would only apply to 2x12 joists or greater?.
A great ?code man?, you are.
A great commutator, you are not!

You are reading that correctly.

So ... what does that tell you about what is required for 2x12 and smaller?

THAT is the answer to YOUR question.

Jerry Peck

04-03-2020, 07:24 AM

Bridging holds the joists in line and helps distribute the load carried by the floor unit. It is usually required when the joist spans are more than 8 feet.

"Required" by what/whom?

'Necessary' for (whatever reason) is not the same as "required".

It?s considered good practice by many (myself included) to install blocking or cross bridging ...

That would be the better way to say it.

Yes, I get it, and congratulations. You were able to answer the question, without a direct answer! (A bit tiring, and drawn out).

Actually, that was the very same answer I first gave, you just kept asking for different wording in the answer, and I finally arrived at wording which got the answer across.

"(A bit tiring, and drawn out)" - yes, getting to wording which you would accept was, but which was the same answer that was first given.

A suggestion, as this is a ?help forum??.
With a direct question, in this case? (Is there a code requiring 2x10s, 16"OC, about 12-14 feet in span, to have "bridging or bracing" in the "center areas"), could have been better communicated, with a simple direct answer. I.e. ?No code requires a 2x10 floor joist, to have center bridging or bracing. The only related reference to this is "R502.7.1 Bridging", but that would only apply to 2x12 joists or greater?.
A great ?code man?, you are.
A great commutator, you are not!

A suggestion from this end is to think about what you read ... and consider not only what it states "is required", but also what is not stated as being required.

My first answer:

In the IRC, in 502.7, addresses what you are referring to as "blocking" at the ends, except that it applies to ALL joists regardless of size.

Bridging, in 502.7.1, is for joists which are larger than 2x12, in which case the bridging between joists shall not be spaced more than 8' apart.

My last (previous) answer:

You are reading that correctly.

So ... what does that tell you about what is required for 2x12 and smaller?

THAT is the answer to YOUR question.

My answer never changed, I just had to word it so you would accept it.

You started off asking about code, thus I made the presumption that you understood codes and their wording.

Codes not only address what 'is required' (by stating it), but also addresses what 'is not stated as required' (i.e., 'not required') by not stating it as being required.

Rich Sumen

04-03-2020, 07:34 AM

Its so easy... once again, and in looking at what you must see as "your defense", you just made my point. We're not in a court of law, just people looking, for basic help on mostly simple questions.
Once again..... A great commutator, you are not.
(I'm not sure if this is "entertainment" to you, or it's just the way you are)
A little of both is my guess!

Again, Thank you (kinda)

"Required" by what/whom?

'Necessary' for (whatever reason) is not the same as "required".

That would be the better way to say it.

Actually, that was the very same answer I first gave, you just kept asking for different wording in the answer, and I finally arrived at wording which got the answer across.

"(A bit tiring, and drawn out)" - yes, getting to wording which you would accept was, but which was the same answer that was first given.

A suggestion from this end is to think about what you read ... and consider not only what it states "is required", but also what is not stated as being required.

My first answer:

My last (previous) answer:

My answer never changed, I just had to word it so you would accept it.[/COLOR]

Jerry Peck

04-03-2020, 07:50 AM

Its so easy... once again, and in looking at what you must see as "your defense", you just made my point. We're not in a court of law, just people looking, for basic help on mostly simple questions.
Once again..... A great commutator, you are not.
(I'm not sure if this is "entertainment" to you, or it's just the way you are)
A little of both is my guess!

Again, Thank you (kinda)

It's not "entertainment" for me, sometimes it just takes working through an answer which is plainly given: i.e. the code states 'what is required', therefore, when the code does not state something as being required, it is 'not required'.

Likewise, when you asked about the 'center area' and acknowledged that there was a different requirement for 'the ends', and the code addresses the 'center area' with diagonal bridging not to exceed 8 feet.

All the information was given in that first answer, I just had to work through the parts you did not understand, and to do that, I first had to figure out what parts you did not understand.

Rich Sumen

04-03-2020, 07:58 AM

Yes, it does address the "center area" but that code would not apply with 2x10 joists. Correct?

The question was simple;
[
House has floor joints 2x10s, 16"OC, about 12-14 feet span, with no "bridging or blocking" in the
"center areas". Floor upstairs is bouncy.]
The answer was not!

It's not "entertainment" for me, sometimes it just takes working through an answer which is plainly given: i.e. the code states 'what is required', therefore, when the code does not state something as being required, it is 'not required'.

Likewise, when you asked about the 'center area' and acknowledged that there was a different requirement for 'the ends', and the code addresses the 'center area' with diagonal bridging not to exceed 8 feet.

All the information was given in that first answer, I just had to work through the parts you did not understand, and to do that, I first had to figure out what parts you did not understand.

Yes, it does address the "center area" but that code would not apply with 2x10 joists. Correct?

INCORRECT!

I thought you got that part of it.

THAT SECTION DOES apply to 2x10 joists.

The requirement in that section IS FOR intermediate bridging/blocking for LARGER THAN 2x12 nominal floor joists.

There IS NO requirement in that section FOR intermediate bridging/blocking fir 2x12 nominal AND SMALLER floor joists.

That section applies TO ALL sizes of floor joists, you just need read what it says ... and does not say.

Rich Sumen

04-03-2020, 10:39 AM

OK, Back to square one i guess. I read this section (502.7.1 below) and the words in it pertain to "Joists exceeding 2x12". So how would this apply to 2x10s? (Sorry, I'm just not seeing it)
What "code section" does show a bridging requirement for these "less than 2x12" joists?
....
R502.7.1 Bridging
.

Joists exceeding a nominal 2 inches by 12 inches(51 mm by 305 mm) shall be supported laterally bysolid blocking, diagonal bridging(wood or metal) or a continuous 1-inch by 3-inch
(25 mm by 76 mm) strip nailed across the bottom of the joists perpendicular to the joists at intervals not exceeding 8 feet(2438 mm).

INCORRECT!

I thought you got that part of it.

THAT SECTION DOES apply to 2x10 joists.

The requirement in that section IS FOR intermediate bridging/blocking for LARGER THAN 2x12 nominal floor joists.

There IS NO requirement in that section FOR intermediate bridging/blocking fir 2x12 nominal AND SMALLER floor joists.

That section applies TO ALL sizes of floor joists, you just need read what it says ... and does not say.

Jerry Peck

04-03-2020, 11:04 AM

OK, Back to square one i guess. I read this section (502.7.1 below) and the words in it pertain to "Joists exceeding 2x12". So how would this apply to 2x10s? (Sorry, I'm just not seeing it)

That section "requires" bridging for floor joists which are larger than 2x12 nominal, correct?

That section "does not" "require" bridging for floor joists which are 2x12 and smaller, correct?

That means that, as minimum requirements (which is what the code is), no bridging is required for 2x10 (which are smaller than 2x12) floor joists.

Is bridging a good 'construction practice'? Yes. But ...

Yes. But ... ???

Yes, bridging is a good construction practice, but ... would you put bridging between 2x10 floor joists which span 8 feet? Likely not.

Rich Sumen

04-03-2020, 03:50 PM

Finally, a common sense answer. (Bridging, not required for joists that are 2x10s).
This should have been on page one, and I would have had my answer with
about 2,000 less words exchanged.
Thank you Jerry Peck!
I'll continue to work on my "code knowledge" and.....
Hopefully, You'll work on those "communication skills"!
Have a great evening.

That section "requires" bridging for floor joists which are larger than 2x12 nominal, correct?

That section "does not" "require" bridging for floor joists which are 2x12 and smaller, correct?

That means that, as minimum requirements (which is what the code is), no bridging is required for 2x10 (which are smaller than 2x12) floor joists.

Is bridging a good 'construction practice'? Yes. But ...

Yes. But ... ???

Yes, bridging is a good construction practice, but ... would you put bridging between 2x10 floor joists which span 8 feet? Likely not.

Jerry Peck

04-04-2020, 05:10 AM

Rich,

I'm curious - if you were given a bucket of black paint and you were told to paint all of the floor joists larger than 2x12 black ... what color would you paint 2x10 floor joists?

Just curious.

Rich Sumen

04-04-2020, 05:38 AM

It was a simple question;
"
Is there a code for "center bridging" of 2x10 joist?"
You answers, & answers, & answers, were not.
It could have easliy been communated with "No, the only applicaple code, applies to 2x12+ joists".

"Work on those communication skills". (Your exhausting)

Rich,

I'm curious - if you were given a bucket of black paint and you were told to paint all of the floor joists larger than 2x12 black ... what color would you paint 2x10 floor joists?

Just curious.

Jerry Peck

04-04-2020, 05:55 AM

Yes, a simple question.

And no answer from you.

I asked this simple question, I'm still waiting for an answer.

I'll make the question even easier:

You are not given any paint, just told to paint floor joists which are larger than 2x12 black.

What color would you paint 2x10 floor joists?

Rich,

I'm curious - if you were given a bucket of black paint and you were told to paint all of the floor joists larger than 2x12 black ... what color would you paint 2x10 floor joists?

Just curious.

Rich Sumen

04-04-2020, 07:33 AM

Your "Smart A$$" question, does not deserve an answer!
(You truly are, "a legend, in your own mind").
Please stop, go away.

Yes, a simple question.

And no answer from you.

I asked this simple question, I'm still waiting for an answer.

I'll make the question even easier:

You are not given any paint, just told to paint floor joists which are larger than 2x12 black.

What color would you paint 2x10 floor joists?

Jerry Peck

04-04-2020, 09:16 AM

Your "Smart A$$" question, does not deserve an answer!

It's not a " "Smart A$$" question".

YOU SAID:

I'll continue to work on my "code knowledge" and.....
Hopefully, You'll work on those "communication skills"!

I'm working on my "communication skills" - IF that question is easily understood, my communication skills were good (it's the same question, just took "code think" out of it); however, IF that question was not easily understood, then I'm asking for your help in finding out why.

YOU were going to work on your "code knowledge" - IF you understood that question (with "code think" out of it), then, yes, you need to work on your "code knowledge" and how you think about the code.

It's really a good example of how to think about those types of code sections ... and, apparently, you did not really mean it when you said you'd work on your "code knowledge" ... I took you at what you said.

Rich Sumen

04-04-2020, 01:22 PM

You just keep making my point (over and over.)
It would be fairly clear to anyone reading this ?thread?, that your ?know it all attitude?, coupled with your ?arrogance & condescending attitude? (clearly on display here), is not only present, but may also be something that you may not even see. (sad).
Please ?GO AWAY?, and annoy someone else that needs your ?I Can Search A Code? skills.

It's not a " "Smart A$$" question".

YOU SAID:

I'm working on my "communication skills" - IF that question is easily understood, my communication skills were good (it's the same question, just took "code think" out of it); however, IF that question was not easily understood, then I'm asking for your help in finding out why.

YOU were going to work on your "code knowledge" - IF you understood that question (with "code think" out of it), then, yes, you need to work on your "code knowledge" and how you think about the code.

It's really a good example of how to think about those types of code sections ... and, apparently, you did not really mean it when you said you'd work on your "code knowledge" ... I took you at what you said.

CHARLIE VAN FLEET

04-04-2020, 01:42 PM

you guys married

Jerry Peck

04-04-2020, 02:05 PM

you guys married

Charlie,

Definitely not!

Please ?GO AWAY?, and annoy someone else that needs your ?

I'm here for anyone who wants to ask questions.

You? You are going off the deep end ... er ... have gone off the deep end ... which is a sign of having little else to say that actually applies.

Rich Sumen

04-04-2020, 02:32 PM

Yup, Little more to say.
Best of luck with your "mental / psychological"issues.

Charlie,

Definitely not!

I'm here for anyone who wants to ask questions.

You? You are going off the deep end ... er ... have gone off the deep end ... which is a sign of having little else to say that actually applies.

Don Hawley

04-06-2020, 04:25 AM

House has floor joints 2x10s, 16"OC, about 12-14 feet span, with no "bridging or blocking" in the
"center areas". Floor upstairs is bouncy.
I can not fine a code requiring "bridging", at center areas. (I do see a code for "blocking" at the ends of the joists, but only for the ends, and only if it is a 2x12+.
IS there a code for "center bridging" of joists???
Any help is appreciated, as I dealing with a new home builder.
Rich this was common practice until the 1980's when framers started using plywood and glue to make the floor system act as one unit. We no longer use bridging for the same reason we do not use 1x12 boxing on the walls or 1x4 sheeting and wood shingels. Move on and join the modern world.

Rich Sumen

04-06-2020, 05:19 AM

Yes, I get it, but since I have never seen them "missing", and since I was dealing with a new build and a bouncy floor, I just wanted to be sure I was not "missing a code", but thanks for the input.
FYI, My frustration was not with "no codes apply", it was dealing with "Mr. arrogant"

Rich this was common practice until the 1980's when framers started using plywood and glue to make the floor system act as one unit. We no longer use bridging for the same reason we do not use 1x12 boxing on the walls or 1x4 sheeting and wood shingels. Move on and join the modern world.

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FAQs

How far apart should joist bridging be? ›

Proper joist spacing is required for proper installation. Joist spacing should never exceed 16” on center unless using TT/AZEK Max board= 24" max. For a more rigid feel, 12” or less, may be preferred. If adding additional framing be sure to keep all boards even and in plane across tops.

What is floor bridging? ›

The term 'bridging' refers to a brace, or an arrangement of braces, that is fixed between floor or roof joists to keep them in place, prevent joist rotation, and distributing loads over more than one joist. Other, similar terms include 'nogging' and 'dwang'.

How do you add bridging to joists? ›

Nail bridging on all joists

Start by making sure the original bridging is tightly fastened; add nails or screws if necessary. Then measure the span of the joists (the distance between walls or beams that support the joists). Divide the span by three and add rows of bridging at both of the one-third points.

How far can a 2x12 span without support? ›

A 2×12 with an E of 800,000 psi and Fb of 790 psi also works, since it can span 15 feet and 10 inches. Given a design span of 15 feet 1 inch and a 16 inch joist spacing, first determine which size lumber will work.

Do you need bridging between joists? ›

Bridging is sometimes required in floors or roofs when solid-sawn lumber joists are used. This addition provides lateral support to twisted joists to help maintain a vertical orientation. It also facilitates load sharing.

What is the most common spacing for floor joists? ›

Most often, floor joist spacing is 16 inches apart on center, but this can vary depending on building codes and the requirements of the structure in the blueprint. Floor joists help distribute the load of a structure.

What are 3 types of bridging in construction? ›

Bridging solves problems that Owners often encounter with other project delivery methods, including the three most commonly used project delivery methods (“Design-Bid-Build”, “Design-Build” and “CM-at-Risk”) illustrated below.

What does bridging joist mean? ›

noun. : a joist resting on the binding joists and supporting the flooring.

What is used for typical joist bridging? ›

Typically, the bridging consists of solid pieces of wood as thick and deep as the joists but fitted tightly between them, at a right angle, or it's made of slender pieces of wood or metal installed in pairs diagonally between joists, creating a series of X shapes.

How far apart should cross bracing be on floor joists? ›

The short answer: deck joists are typically spaced either 12 inches or 16 inches apart, on center. (On-center means the length from the center of one joist to the center of the next joist, rather than a gap from edge to edge).

Is bridging or blocking better? ›

Too often, pieces of solid blocking are removed and not replaced by plumbers and electricians. X-type bridging is less likely to be taken out in the first place, and if it is removed, it's much easier to replace around the wiring or the pipes than solid blocking is.

Can floor joists be 24 inches on center? ›

23/32" OSB is recommended for joist spacing up to 19.2" on-center. 7/8" OSB is recommended for spacing up to a maximum of 24" on-center while 1 1/8" OSB is recommended for spacing up to 32" on-center.

How far can a 2x10 span on 12 centers? ›

Max. Live Load 30 lbs/ft2 (1436 N/m2)
Maximum Span (ft - in)
Nominal Size (inches)Joist Spacing Center to Center (inches)Lumber Grade
2 x 101619' - 1"
2416' - 8"
2 x 121225' - 7"
10 more rows

How far can a 2x10 floor joist span without support? ›

A 2×10 southern yellow pine joist can span 16 feet and 1 inch without support. A doubled 2×10 beam can span 11' without support for a deck that is 4' wide. Lengths of 2×10 joists and beams vary depending on the application you are using them for as well.

Do I need blocking between floor joists? ›

Blocking panels are required at each end of floor joists not otherwise restrained from overturning by a band joist or rim board. Blocking panels are required between floor joists supporting load-bearing walls running perpendicular to the joists.

Do I need blocking between I-joists? ›

Engineered I-joists can span long distances to make a flat and solid subfloor. Tying the joists together with blocking makes the floor even stronger and stiffer. So one of the last things that need to be done before sheathing the deck is to fill in with joist blocking.

How far can joists span without support? ›

A rule of thumb is 1.5 times a joist's depth but in feet when spaced at 16” centers. In general, a 2×8 will span 1.5 x 8, so 12-feet. Based on all factors though, a 2×8 joist span is 7'-1” to 16'-6”, and a rafter 6'-7” and 23'-9”.

What is standard joist spacing accommodate? ›

Joist Spacing is determined by owner/builder preference or “value engineering”. – Traditional Spacing: 16” o.c. – Engineered Components Popular Spacing: 19.2” or 24” o.c.

What determines the spacing of joists? ›

The spacing of the floor joists depends on the spanning capacity of flooring being supported. The maximum allowable spacing of joists supporting tongue and groove strip and sheet flooring relates to the species of wood, grade and thickness.

What are the two types of bridging used between floor joists? ›

There are two main methods of joist bridging-solid bridging and cross bridging. In solid floor bridging, a solid timber having equal depth to the joist's depth is installed between two adjacent joists. This solid timber floor bracing should run perpendicular to the direction of the joist span.

What are the 5 main bridge types? ›

Five main types of Bridges
  • Beam Bridges.
  • Integral Beam Bridges.
  • Cantilever Bridges.
  • Arch Bridges.
  • Cable-stayed Bridges.
21 Mar 2022

What are the 4 main components of a bridge? ›

FOllowings are the main parts of a bridge:
  • Deck.
  • Abutment.
  • Pile.
  • Pier.
  • Girder.
  • Rail Track.

What are the 3 most common bridges? ›

The most common types of modern bridges include: beam, truss, arch, cantilever, cable-stay and suspension. A beam bridge, the simplest type of bridge, is made of long beams of wood, metal or concrete that are supported at each end by piers.

What are the 3 main components of a bridge? ›

The main components of a bridge are the foundation, substructure, and the superstructure.

What is the most common type of bridge used in construction today? ›

Beam Bridges

The most popular bridge in existence is the multiple beam bridge. Most span approximately 40-100 feet and consist of steel or prestressed concrete beams that are supported by abutments or piers. The beams can have a variety of shapes such as I-sections, T-sections, or box sections.

How do you stiffen a bridging floor? ›

Bridging, or “X-bracing,” allows joists to share weight. As a footstep falls on one joist, some of the force is transferred to neighboring joists. Even if your joists already have a row of bridging at the center of the span, adding a row on each side of the existing bridging will stiffen the floor.

When placing a bundle of joist bridging on steel joists What requirements must you follow? ›

The weight of a bundle of joist bridging must not exceed a total of 1,000 pounds, and: A bundle of joist bridging must be placed on a minimum of three steel joists that are secured at one end. The edge of the bridging bundle must be within 1 foot of the secured end.

Where is cross-bracing needed? ›

Cross bracing is a commonly utilized piece of a building's structural system, particularly in industrial, warehouse and commercial buildings. It is sometimes removed to make room for door and window installations, or at building expansion lines. It also can be damaged due to vehicular collisions.

What angle should cross-bracing be? ›

Bracing is most efficient when placed at angles between 30° and 60°. With steeper bevels, the end connections can be cumbersome.

Where is cross-bracing installed? ›

Cross bracing can be seen in situations like flooring, where cross braces are put between floor joists in order to prevent movement.

Does blocking increase joist span? ›

Deck Blocking And Bridging

Some deck builders install blocking throughout the frame to increase the strength of long joist spans and promote a more solid structure. Often times, scrap materials from your framing lumber may be used for blocking.

Can you use screws for joist blocking? ›

Square down from the chalkline on one side of every joist to provide a reference line for installing the blocking. 10. Through-screw the blocking where possible. Use at least two screws per end to secure the blocking.

Does blocking strengthen floor joists? ›

Building code requires the use of blocking for floor joists that exceed 2 inches in width by 12 inches in depth. Blocking also needs to be provided at the supporting end of a joist. In addition to providing lateral support, blocking helps transfer weight to adjacent joists, so that the floor acts as a unified system.

What is the most common length between studs center to center )? ›

The most common, and standard distance between wall studs is 16-inches. So if you don't know how to space your studs then space them at 16-inches. This is what most contractors use for all wall studs.

What is 19.2 spacing used for? ›

Increasing the spacing of the studs to 19.2 or 24 inches on center decreases the amount of lumber needed while still allowing for easy attachment of the drywall on the interior or sheathing on the exterior.

What is the longest length of 2x10 you can buy? ›

Dimensions
Actual Product Length (ft.)20 ft1.5 in
Actual Product Width (in.)9.25 in2x10
Nominal Product Length (ft.)20 ft2 in
Nominal Product Width (in.)10 in

How far can a 2x12 span 16 on Center? ›

A 2×12 (2-by-12) floor joists can span up to 23 feet 3 inches, 2×10 (2-by-10) up to 19 feet 1 inches, 2×8 (2-by-8) up to 15 feet & 2×6 (2-by-6) up to 11 feet 4 inches at 16″ spaced by using southern yellow pine graded as #1 when live load of 30 lbs/ft^2 & dead load of 10 lbs/ ft^2.

Can a 2x12 span 20 feet? ›

For a 20 foot span, you will need atleast 2×12 size of lumber/ floor joist when spaced at 16″ apart. Thus, a 2×12 size of lumber can allow to span 20 feet. For a 20-foot spans, the lumber has to be at least 12 inches in depth used as floor joist.

How far can a 2 by 12 floor joist span? ›

Joist made of southern pine or Douglas Fir by using grade #1 or #2, a 2×6 floor joists can span up to 10 feet, 2×8 upto 12 feet, 2×10 upto 16 feet and 2×12 upto 20 feet from beam to beam when spaced the standard 16 inches apart with a maximum residential floor loads of 50 PSF.

How far can a double 2x6 floor joist span? ›

2-grade 2×6 joists can span up to 10 feet 9 inches from beam to beam when spaced the standard 16 inches apart with a maximum live load of 30 inches per square foot.

Can you span 12 feet with a 2x6? ›

According to the International Residential Code 2018 (IRC), the maximum length a 2x6 can span as a floor joist is 12'-6”, as a ceiling joist is 20'-8”, as a rafter is 18'-0”, as a deck board is 24', and as a deck joist is 9'-11”.

How far apart should floor bracing be? ›

Examining Your Floor Joists

Joists are parallel pieces of wood spaced at regular intervals that normally measure 12, 16 or 24 inches from center to center. They're usually made of standard 2-inch planks, which come in different lengths depending on the size of the room.

How far apart do holes in joists need to be? ›

Keep the distance between adjacent holes at least twice the diameter of the largest hole. For holes larger than 4 in., consult the lumber supplier.

What is a bridging joist? ›

noun. : a joist resting on the binding joists and supporting the flooring.

Is solid bridging better than cross bridging? ›

But there's always an X, not the inverted V you have. Both solid bridging and cross bridging serve the same purpose and are considered equally effective. During construction, the bridging keeps joists vertical so they can't twist out of place.

What is the difference between blocking and bridging? ›

Cross bracing or bridging is another system that reinforces a structure of a building just like blocking does. The difference is that the cross-bracing uses two pieces of support in a diagonal shape that creates an X between the joists instead of a solid block in blocking.

Should flooring go parallel or perpendicular? ›

Wood floors should always be laid perpendicular to floor joists—across rather that in between them. This will make the floors structurally sound and will help prevent the planks from separating, sagging or buckling.

What Centres should joists be? ›

Decking Joist Spacing

Decking joists should be spaced at 400mm centres. Structural posts should be positioned no more than 1800mm apart.

What is code for drilling holes in floor joists? ›

Holes bored in joists shall not be within 2 inches (51 mm) of the top or bottom of the joist, and the diameter of any such hole shall not exceed one-third the depth of the joist. Notches in the top or bottom of joists shall not exceed one-sixth the depth and shall not be located in the middle third of the span.

Where should you not drill holes in joists? ›

You can put holes in floor joists anywhere along the length of the joist, but you can't put them any closer than 2″ from the top or bottom edge of a joist. The maximum size of a hole is 1/3 the depth of the floor joist.

Can you drill a 3 hole in a 2x10 floor joist? ›

Simply following building code, you'll only be allowed to bore a 3-5/64" hole through a 2x10 joist. A 2x10 is actually only 9-1/4" deep, and building codes set the maximum hole size to 1/3 the depth of the member (9-1/4" / 3 = 3.08333").

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